2022 Courses

Explore these Summer 2022 courses and when you're ready, apply to be a visiting Stanford student. Apply early for the best course choice when enrollment opens.

Course List

  • Implicit Bias: Stereotyping, Prejudice, and the Psychology of Racism

    Catalog Number
    ANTHRO 145S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This class explores the psychology and sociology of prejudice, asking a deceptively simple question: what is race? From here follows a second question: what is racism? We'll explore implicit bias, and equip students to understand it, recognize it, and critically evaluate it. We'll start by outlining early colonial theories of scientific racism and the ongoing myths around race and intelligence, including phrenology, eugenics, and discussions of stereotype threat and IQ. We will question how race can be at once not based in any evolutionary, demographic, or biological reality and yet be a driving force in many social and political arenas. We will then examine stereotypes more widely, and how they can persist in society despite the decline of overt prejudice, through mechanisms of implicit bias, microaggression, and institutional racism. Students will take from this course a much deeper understanding of how prejudice shaped the contemporary world and how different approaches to understanding our own and others' implicit bias have implications for social policy and social justice.

    Details

    Class Number
    24588
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Sam Maull
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MW 3:15-4:45pm
  • Accelerated First-Year Chinese, Part 1

    Catalog Number
    CHINLANG 1A
    Course Cost
    $6165.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This Chinese language course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The goal is to develop communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the elementary level.

    Details

    Class Number
    23973
    Units
    5
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Michelle DiBello
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MTWThF 10:30am-11:45am
  • History of YouTube

    Catalog Number
    COMM 101S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Since its launch in 2005, YouTube has become the second most visited website in the world, with more than 1 billion monthly users. It has influenced the worlds of entertainment, politics, and business alike. It has launched the careers of A-list celebrities while also creating an entirely new celebrity ecosystem. It has become a crucial political tool for presidential candidates and political subcultures alike. In the process, it has upended the entertainment industry and much of its business model. From the beginning, it has also been a source of controversy, raising questions about its role in promoting cyberbullying, radicalization, and harmful content. This course will provide an overview of the platform’s cultural history. Drawing on communication studies, media theory, and science and technology studies, we will explore how the platform has evolved in its seventeen years of existence, and how it has influenced, and been influenced by, its cultural and political environment. Students will be introduced to concepts such as participatory culture, microcelebrity, and platform politics. We will grapple with questions such as: how have YouTube’s new technological features shaped the culture of the platform, and vice versa? How does community function on the platform, and how has that changed over time? And how have YouTube’s content policies affected each of these dynamics? As we address these questions, we will come to grapple with the broader concerns of what it means to be a platform online and why a history of platforms matters.

    Details

    Class Number
    23966
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Becca Lewis
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    TTh 11am-1pm
  • Digital Media and Social Networks

    Catalog Number
    COMM 111S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Our social interactions and relationships are important. Who we communicate with, how we communicate, and the quantity and quality of our social relationships all have an impact on our psychological well-being. Today, many of our interactions and relationships play out online in digital media, like social media platforms (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, TikTok) and smartphones. In this course, we will explore (1) how communication behavior and social networks shape our lives online and offline, (2) the influence of personality and well-being on social life, and (3) social network approaches to studying interactions and relationships. By combining theory and research from communication and media psychology with social network analysis, we can understand how media platforms impact our psychological experiences and social environments. With communication technology playing an ever-increasing role in society, understanding how social interactions and relationships impact our lives has never been more critical.

    Details

    Class Number
    24793
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Mahnaz Roshanaei
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    TuTh 4-6pm
  • Principles of Economics

    Catalog Number
    ECON 1
    Course Cost
    $6165.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This is an introductory course in economics. We will cover both microeconomics (investigating decisions by individuals and firms) and macroeconomics (examining the economy as a whole). The primary goal is to develop and then build on your understanding of the analytical tools and approaches used by economists. This will help you to interpret economic news and economic data at a much deeper level while also forming your own opinions on economic issues. The course will also provide a strong foundation for those of you who want to continue on with intermediate microeconomics and/or intermediate macroeconomics and possibly beyond.

    Details

    Class Number
    7120
    Units
    5
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    John Taylor
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MW 9am-10:50am
  • Money and Banking

    Catalog Number
    ECON 111
    Course Cost
    $6165.00
    Population
    Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    The primary course goal is for students to master the logic, intuition and operation of a financial system - money, financial markets (money and capital markets, debt and equity markets, derivatives markets), and financial institutions and intermediaries (the Central Bank, depository institutions, credit unions, pension funds, insurance companies, venture capital firms, investment banks, mutual funds, etc.). In other words, how money/capital change hands between agents over time, directly and through institutions. Material will be both quantitative and qualitative, yet always highly analytical with a focus on active learning - there will be an approximately equal emphasis on solving mathematical finance problems (e.g. bond or option pricing) and on policy analysis (e.g. monetary policy and financial regulation.) Students will not be rewarded for memorizing and regurgitating facts, but rather for demonstrating the ability to reason with difficult problems and situations with which they might not previously be familiar. Prerequisite: Econ 50, 52. Strongly recommended but not required: some familiarity with finance and statistics (e.g. Econ 135 or 140, Econ 102A) Students will be required to submit the 2022 Summer Session ECON 111 Prerequisite form for visiting students to receive a permission code to enroll in this course.

    Details

    Class Number
    24049
    Units
    5
    Course Format & Length
    Online, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Greg La Blanc
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    ECON 50, ECON 52

    Schedule
    TTh 6pm-8pm
  • Trenches, Guerrillas, and Bombs: Modern Warfare in East Asian History

    Catalog Number
    HISTORY 95E
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate
    Summary

    This course is an introduction to the field of military history. But rather than centering on the typical Western perspectives, it focuses on studying the East Asian modern warfare during the early 20th century. Students will investigate, define, and historicize different kinds of wars, and draw historical lessons to better understand the contemporary military conflicts. From the trench warfare in the Russo-Japanese War, to the guerrilla warfare of the Chinese Communist Party, and to Americans’ strategic bombing in the Korean War, students will identify modern warfare’s historical characteristics in East Asia and reflect on how they continue to affect the politics in the region today.

    Details

    Class Number
    23875
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Claudius Kim
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MW 1:30pm-3pm
    Cross Listings
    HISTORY 295E
  • United Nations Peacekeeping

    Catalog Number
    INTNLREL 160
    Course Cost
    $4932.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This seminar is devoted to an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. We will look at the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, with the striking exception of the Congo Crisis of 1960; the rise and fall of so-called "second-generation peacekeeping," more accurately labeled "peace enforcement," in the early 1990s in Bosnia and Somalia; and the reemergence in recent years of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa, most notably in Congo in 2013.nStudents will learn the basic history of the United Nations since 1945 and the fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, especially with respect to the use of force and the sovereignty of member states. While the course does not attempt to provide comprehensive coverage of the historical details of any particular peacekeeping mission, students should come away with a firm grasp of the historical trajectory of U.N. peacekeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.

    Details

    Class Number
    12219
    Units
    4
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Bertrand Patenaude
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MW 1:30pm-3pm
  • Philosophy as Freedom

    Catalog Number
    PHIL 23S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate
    Summary

    Philosophizing, if done correctly, can be life-changing: new ideas can change the way we think about, look at, interact, engage and deal with the world around us. New ideas can bring out problems that we could not even see as problems before; they can change our conception of how and why we are to live the lives in the way we think we should; they can change our relations with other individuals who either share or do not share the ideas that we have newly come to acquire. The aim of this course is to provide a broad-ranging, general introduction to a wide range of topics including justice, race, gender, metaphysics and more through a philosophical exploration of some of the ideas that have shaped and are currently shaping our world today.

    Details

    Class Number
    24451
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Kim, Hyoung Sung
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    TTh 11:30am-1pm
  • Introduction to International Relations

    Catalog Number
    POLISCI 101Z
    Course Cost
    $4932.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate
    Summary

    Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.

    Details

    Class Number
    11200
    Units
    4
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MTW 3pm-4pm
    Cross Listings
    INTNLREL 101Z

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Estimated Tuition

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Students who take Summer Session courses are awarded Stanford credit. Course costs are set by the university, based on number of units.
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