2022 Courses

Explore these Summer 2022 courses and when you're ready, apply to be a visiting Stanford student. Apply early for the best course choice when enrollment opens.

Course List

  • Implicit Bias: Stereotyping, Prejudice, and the Psychology of Racism

    Catalog Number
    ANTHRO 145S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This class explores the psychology and sociology of prejudice, asking a deceptively simple question: what is race? From here follows a second question: what is racism? We'll explore implicit bias, and equip students to understand it, recognize it, and critically evaluate it. We'll start by outlining early colonial theories of scientific racism and the ongoing myths around race and intelligence, including phrenology, eugenics, and discussions of stereotype threat and IQ. We will question how race can be at once not based in any evolutionary, demographic, or biological reality and yet be a driving force in many social and political arenas. We will then examine stereotypes more widely, and how they can persist in society despite the decline of overt prejudice, through mechanisms of implicit bias, microaggression, and institutional racism. Students will take from this course a much deeper understanding of how prejudice shaped the contemporary world and how different approaches to understanding our own and others' implicit bias have implications for social policy and social justice.

    Details

    Class Number
    24588
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Sam Maull
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MW 3:15-4:45pm
  • Drawing Outdoors

    Catalog Number
    ARTSTUDI 141S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    In this introductory class, we take drawing out into the world, exploring different environments, techniques, and approaches as we go. The fundamental nuts-and-bolts of basic drawing techniques: light logic, depicting depth and drawing the figure, are integrated into each environment. From the Stanford campus: its cafe's, architecture and landscaping, to redwoods and water, to more urban settings, drawings will range from high-speed gestures to longer, more contemplative work. Through pen, graphite, charcoal, ink, watercolor/gouache and mixed media, we explore dichotomous relationships, as well as those in seemingly perfect harmony. We move from the inanimate to animate, figure and architecture, motion and stillness, to the micro and macro, considering how even the smallest patch of earth may be as monumental as Hoover Tower. Both beginning and advanced students are welcome.

    Details

    Class Number
    24075
    Units
    3
    Interest Area
    Creativity and Design
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Andrew Catanese
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    Note: Limited enrollment. Attendance at first class mandatory. Enrollment will be determined at first class meeting. Priority to Undergraduate art practice majors/minors.

    Schedule
    MW 10:30am-12:30pm
  • DIY Animation & Video

    Catalog Number
    ARTSTUDI 167S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This course will introduce students to stop-motion animation and video editing techniques for art making, created on cell phones and with freely available software and tools. Students in this class will analyze and create lo-res or "DIY" works designed for fast production and distribution via internet and social media channels.

    Details

    Class Number
    24077
    Units
    3
    Interest Area
    Creativity and Design
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Liz Maelane
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    Note: Limited enrollment. Attendance at first class mandatory. Enrollment will be determined at first class meeting. Priority to Undergraduate art practice majors/minors.

    Schedule
    TTh 10:30am-12:30pm
  • Cell Phone Photography

    Catalog Number
    ARTSTUDI 173S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.

    Details

    Class Number
    24076
    Units
    3
    Interest Area
    Creativity and Design
    Course Format & Length
    Online, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Krystal Ramirez
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    Note: Limited enrollment. Attendance at first class mandatory. Enrollment will be determined at first class meeting. Priority to Undergraduate art practice majors/minors.

    Schedule
    MW 1:30pm-3:30pm
  • Understanding Energy - Essentials

    Catalog Number
    CEE107S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy as a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world.

    Details

    Class Number
    6328
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    Algebra

    Schedule
    MW 11:30am-1pm
    Cross Listings
    CEE 207S
  • Accelerated First-Year Chinese, Part 1

    Catalog Number
    CHINLANG 1A
    Course Cost
    $6165.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    This Chinese language course is designed for students with no previous knowledge of the language. The goal is to develop communicative competence in listening, speaking, reading and writing skills at the elementary level.

    Details

    Class Number
    23973
    Units
    5
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Michelle DiBello
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    MTWThF 10:30am-11:45am
  • Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers

    Catalog Number
    CME 102
    Course Cost
    $6165.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications are presented. For analytical methods students learn to solve linear and non-linear first order ODEs; linear second order ODEs; and Laplace transforms. Numerical methods using MATLAB programming tool kit are also introduced to solve various types of ODEs including: first and second order ODEs, higher order ODEs, systems of ODEs, initial and boundary value problems, finite differences, and multi-step methods. This also includes accuracy and linear stability analyses of various numerical algorithms which are essential tools for the modern engineer. This class is foundational for professional careers in engineering and as a preparation for more advanced classes at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Prerequisites: knowledge of single-variable calculus equivalent to the content of Math 19-21 (e.g., 5 on Calc BC, 4 on Calc BC with Math 21, 5 on Calc AB with Math 21). Placement diagnostic (recommendation non-binding).

    Details

    Class Number
    24000
    Units
    5
    Interest Area
    Math and Data Science
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Hung Le
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test), or MATH 19 to MATH 21. Recommended: CME 100.

    Schedule
    TTh 9:45am-11:45am
    Cross Listings
    ENGR 155A
  • Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers

    Catalog Number
    CME 106
    Course Cost
    $4932.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.

    Details

    Class Number
    4771
    Units
    4
    Interest Area
    Math and Data Science
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Dates
    -
    Prerequisites

    CME 100/ENGR 154 or MATH 51 or 52

    Schedule
    TTh 5:30pm-7:30pm
    Cross Listings
    ENGR 155C
  • History of YouTube

    Catalog Number
    COMM 101S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Since its launch in 2005, YouTube has become the second most visited website in the world, with more than 1 billion monthly users. It has influenced the worlds of entertainment, politics, and business alike. It has launched the careers of A-list celebrities while also creating an entirely new celebrity ecosystem. It has become a crucial political tool for presidential candidates and political subcultures alike. In the process, it has upended the entertainment industry and much of its business model. From the beginning, it has also been a source of controversy, raising questions about its role in promoting cyberbullying, radicalization, and harmful content. This course will provide an overview of the platform’s cultural history. Drawing on communication studies, media theory, and science and technology studies, we will explore how the platform has evolved in its seventeen years of existence, and how it has influenced, and been influenced by, its cultural and political environment. Students will be introduced to concepts such as participatory culture, microcelebrity, and platform politics. We will grapple with questions such as: how have YouTube’s new technological features shaped the culture of the platform, and vice versa? How does community function on the platform, and how has that changed over time? And how have YouTube’s content policies affected each of these dynamics? As we address these questions, we will come to grapple with the broader concerns of what it means to be a platform online and why a history of platforms matters.

    Details

    Class Number
    23966
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Becca Lewis
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    TTh 11am-1pm
  • Digital Media and Social Networks

    Catalog Number
    COMM 111S
    Course Cost
    $3699.00
    Population
    High School, Undergraduate, Graduate
    Summary

    Our social interactions and relationships are important. Who we communicate with, how we communicate, and the quantity and quality of our social relationships all have an impact on our psychological well-being. Today, many of our interactions and relationships play out online in digital media, like social media platforms (e.g., Facebook, Instagram, TikTok) and smartphones. In this course, we will explore (1) how communication behavior and social networks shape our lives online and offline, (2) the influence of personality and well-being on social life, and (3) social network approaches to studying interactions and relationships. By combining theory and research from communication and media psychology with social network analysis, we can understand how media platforms impact our psychological experiences and social environments. With communication technology playing an ever-increasing role in society, understanding how social interactions and relationships impact our lives has never been more critical.

    Details

    Class Number
    24793
    Units
    3
    Course Format & Length
    In-Person, 8 weeks
    Instructors
    Mahnaz Roshanaei
    Dates
    -
    Schedule
    TuTh 4-6pm

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Estimated Tuition

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Students who take Summer Session courses are awarded Stanford credit. Course costs are set by the university, based on number of units.
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